Last edited by Akinohn
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

9 edition of A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas found in the catalog.

A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas

by Robert Reisz

  • 373 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by University of Kansas in Lawrence .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Kansas.
    • Subjects:
    • Reptiles, Fossil -- Kansas,
    • Paleontology -- Pennsylvanian,
    • Paleontology -- Kansas

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 72-74.

      Statementby Robert R. Reisz.
      SeriesSpecial publication / University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History ;, no. 7, Special publication (University of Kansas. Museum of Natural History) ;, no. 7.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQE861 .R44
      The Physical Object
      Pagination74 p., [1] folded leaf of plates :
      Number of Pages74
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3924400M
      ISBN 100893380113
      LC Control Number81622009
      OCLC/WorldCa8051411

      An Erpetopus trackway recorded in the Lower Permian Collio Formation (Orobic Alps, northern Italy) is investigated as a source of data to reconstruct ancestral patterns of locomotion in eureptiles. The inferred small-sized captorhinid-“protorothyridid” producer cut an inclined muddy surface dragging its front limb digits, tail, and belly on the ground. Integrating ichnological and Cited by: "'Cadbury is a wonderful writer, weaving natural history, human history and science together in a smooth, flowing tapestry that keeps you turning the pages as if her book were a thriller.'" The Times. Callison, George - Intracranial mobility in Kansas mosasaurs. - Univ. Kansas Paleont. Contr. Paper 26; 15 pp., 10 fig. Orig. wrps., very.

      For almost a decade now, a team of molecular evolutionists has produced a plethora of seemingly precise molecular clock estimates for divergence events ranging from the speciation of cats and dogs to lineage separations that might have occurred ∼4 billion years ago. Because the appearance of accuracy has an irresistible allure, non-specialists frequently treat these estimates as factual. In Cited by: Full text of "The dinosaur book: the ruling reptiles and their relatives" See other formats.

      You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Of the marine reptile groups studied, the ichthyosaur fossil record in particular yielded many large to enormously large but disarticulated body fossils of late Early Triassic age, as demonstrated for example by the discovery of a giant humerus from the mid-late Spathian of the Thaynes Formation (Idaho, western USA, Figs. 2D-G, 3).Cited by:


Share this book
You might also like
Catalogue of the music in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Catalogue of the music in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Margaret Hetzel.

Margaret Hetzel.

Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, Riverton Unit

Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, Riverton Unit

Birding for Beginners

Birding for Beginners

Phrase and subject

Phrase and subject

Walter Benjamins grave

Walter Benjamins grave

link between public and private insurance and HIV-related mortality

link between public and private insurance and HIV-related mortality

Jean Renoir

Jean Renoir

Property development in North-West Europe

Property development in North-West Europe

Discovery of New-England by the Northmen five hundred years before Columbus

Discovery of New-England by the Northmen five hundred years before Columbus

A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas by Robert Reisz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: book: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Reisz, Robert. Diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Lawrence: University of Kansas, Additional Physical Format: Online version: Reisz, Robert. Diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas.

Lawrence: University of Kansas, The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity : Reisz, Robert.

A Diapsid Reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. View/ Open. Reisz_pdf (Mb) Issue Date Author. Reisz, Robert R. Publisher. Natural History Museum, University of Kansas.

Type. Book. Is part of series. Special Publication;7. Rights. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Cited by: A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas Item Preview remove-circle A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas by Reisz, Robert.

Publication date This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. Pages: Araeoscelidia or Araeoscelida is a clade of extinct diapsid reptiles superficially resembling lizards, extending from the Late Carboniferous to the Early group contains the genera Araeoscelis, Petrolacosaurus, the possibly aquatic Spinoaequalis, and less well-known genera such as Kadaliosaurus and clade is considered to be the sister group to all (currently known Clade: Diapsida.

Petrolacosaurus is a member of the basal diapsid order Araeoscelidia, along with the aquatic, late Pennsylvanian Spinoaequalis. The specific taxonomic placement of Petrolacosaurus is a highly debated topic.

Because of the unusual osteological characters and how old the reptile is, scientists go back and forth between what position makes the Class: Reptilia. The Upper Pennsylvanian Fossillagerstätte near Hamilton, Kansas, and another locality near Garnett, Kansas, U.S.A., have recently provided most of the evidence about the initial stages of amniote.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas / View Metadata. By: Reisz, Robert. Field book, Pennsylvanian plant fossils of Illinois / View Metadata. By: Collinson. Amniote phylogeny illustrating revised nomenclature assuming diapsid identity of Testudines as hypothesized by Zardoya and Meyer (), Hedges and Poling (), and Rieppel and Reisz (), employing the revised phylogenetic definition for Reptilia suggested in the indicate taxon names for by:   Tertiary Vertebrata, book I.

Washington: Government Printing Office, + XXXV. Google Scholar Cope. A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas.

University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Special Publication Cited by: The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities.

The following person has been designated to handle inquiries. An enigmatic new diapsid reptile from the Upper Permian of Eastern Europe Article in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 22(Dec ) January with 81 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Sean Patrick Modesto.

Lee, M. Molecules, morphology, and the monophyly of diapsid reptiles. Contributions to A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Special Publication of the Museum of Natural History, University of Carroll R.L.

() Problems of the Ancestry of Turtles. In: Brinkman D., Holroyd P., Gardner J. (eds) Morphology and Cited by: The affinities and ecology of Triassic ichthyosaurs.

Geological Society of America Bulletin McGowan, C. The Successful Dragons. Samuel Stevens, Toronto and Sarasota. Reisz, R. A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Occasional Papers, Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas Rieppel, O.

Cited by: The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that spans 60 million years from the end of the Devonian Period million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Permian Period, Mya.

The name Carboniferous means "coal-bearing" and derives from the Latin words carbō ("coal") and ferō ("I bear, I carry"), and was coined by geologists William Conybeare and William Phillips in   Anatomy of the enigmatic reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Germany and its relevance for the origin of Sauria.

PLoS ONE 10(9), e doi: / PubMed PubMedCentral CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 3. This chapter discusses temporal and spatial distribution of tooth implantations in ichthyosaurs. The arrangement of the maxillary teeth suggests that a distolingual replacement of functional tooth occurs and migrates toward the latter to replace it.

Reisz, R. A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Special Publication Cited by: The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that extends from the end of the Devonian Period, at ± million years ago, to the beginning of the Permian Period, at ± Ma.

The name Carboniferous means "coal-bearing" and derives from the Latin words carbō (“coal”) and ferō (“I bear, I carry”), and was coined by geologists William Conybeare and William Phillips.

A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas. Reptiles, Fossil -- Kansas; Paleontology -- Pennsylvanian; Paleontology -- Kansas. PENNSYLVANIAN DIAPSID REPTILE Fig. —Petrolacosmirus kausemis Lane. Mature skull and lower jaws with articulated cervical vertebrae, and an isolated right cleithrum, KUTx 2.

Carboniferous: | | The |Carboniferous| is a |geologic period and system| that extends from the World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ever assembled.Image from page 15 of "A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas" () by Internet Archive Book Images Title: A diapsid reptile from the Pennsylvanian of Kansas Identifier: diapsidreptilefr00reis.The term prehistoric reptile covers a broad category that is intended to help distinguish the dinosaurs from other prehistoric reptiles.

As the dinosaurs, because of their long and successful reign for many millions of years, are almost exclusively dealt with in their own category of prehistoric lif.